A well established and  highly regarded adult orthopedic/sports medicine Physical and Occupational therapy practice with 4 branches in the Greater NY/NJ area is available for sale.

This is a well established and highly regarded multidisciplinary ( PT and OT) practice  with 4 offices located in great, strategic locations in the Greater NY/NJ area.  primarily focused on orthopaedic, musculoskeletal and fitness/wellness The practice enjoys a great reputation and receives steady patient referrals from many physicians, their informative website, as well as word of mouth. Collectively the practice  has over 40 employees, provides over 1600  treatment sessions monthly and collectively generates over 2.5-3$M in revenue. Each office is fully renovated, fully equipped and staffed.  The terms of the leases are extremely favorable, transferable and renewable. All leasehold improvements to each space shall remain for the benefit of the new owner under the terms of the lease.  The practices are strictly out of network, with the exception of being approved Medicare providers with competitive billing rates and low AR.

Full financial information including but not limited to practice statistics, profit and loss statements, balance sheets, and tax returns for the last 2 years are available for inspection.  Ask price and terms will be disclosed to serious inquiries and qualified buyers. For more information: Please email:  sww_1970@hotmail.com

Great Opportunity to Purchase a Boutique Holistic Physical Therapy Practice in the Greater Los Angeles, California area

A  highly regarded holistic adult physical therapy practice in the Greater Los Angeles California area is for sale. This is a great opportunity to purchase a growing practice or to establish a fantastic second location.

Due to the upcoming relocation of the owner, this boutique physical therapy practice owner is seeking a like-minded holistic physical therapist who is looking for a strong foundation upon which to continue to build a loyal following of clients, or for someone who wants a great second location for their existing practice inside a well known and popular gym in the Greater Los Angeles area. The current owner only practices on a part time basis, so there is tremendous opportunity for future growth and development simply by expanding available hours for treatment.  

Taking a patient-centered approach, which addresses the whole person rather than simply the symptoms; sessions are one-on-one and mostly hands-on. Pilates is offered, and all patients are encouraged to use the gym facility before/after each session to improve outcomes. The practice is organized as strictly out-of-network and accepts Medicare insurance. The practice averages approximately 15-20 productive visits per week and receives approximately 2-3 new patients per month.   

The clean and modern physical office is on the ground floor; there are no steps to access the office and the office is ADA compliant.  There is a private room as well as access to the open gym area that is equipped with treadmills, ergonomic bikes, free weights, balls, mats, etc., all in excellent condition.  The private room offers a light dimmer and sound machine to improve patient relaxation. There is also a flat area outside of the gym that allows for community gait training. The shared bathroom is equipped with showers. 

Office hours are very flexible. The gym is open weekdays from 5:30 AM to 9:00 PM and weekends from 9:00 AM to 6:00 PM. Patients can be treated in the gym at any time.  The private office is available for over 30 hours per week; however, it is currently being utilized for only 10-18 hours per week, by her choice.  The gym owner is willing to give the new PT owner a lease with a monthly rent of $1000 per month.  

The office is in a very upbeat, mixed-use neighborhood of residential buildings and commercial establishments. It is within walking distance to restaurants, a shipping/mailing service store, a school, doctors’ offices, an acupuncturist’s office, a yoga studio, as well as a bank, grocery store, park, and recreation center. Major LA landmarks are in close proximity.  

Full financial information including but not limited to practice statistics, profit and loss statements, balance sheets, and tax returns for the last 2 years are available for inspection. The gross revenue for the company last year was $100.000,00 and it has great potential to increase. 

Terms: 

Ask price is negotiable; the purchase price will  include  the web site and domain name, active patients, database of past and current patients (approximately 165 names and email addresses), and all equipment.  Current biller is willing to stay on with new owner.  

Owner is willing to finance part of the deal provided that 50% of the price is paid in cash upon closing.  Owner is willing to stay on for a reasonable transition period to introduce buyer to referral sources, patients etc. and would continue to stay on as needed for a defined transitional period if new owner wants some overlap time to ensure a smooth transition. If requested, owner can also consult remotely on business and/or clinical issues on an as-needed basis for a mutually agreed upon fee. 

Serious inquiries only: Please contact Chris at: LNRexpress+bhwa@gmail.com

 

Early Rate Registration is on for the Live Webiner November 15th – The Ins and Outs of Selling Your Private Practice- 7:30-9:30 PM EST

Live interactive webinar 11.15 2017 7:30-9:30 PM EST
Early rate registration ( $85 (ends Oct 31st)

If you envision a time when you will sell your practice, never forget that the best way to build a practice is to build it as if you’re going to sell it. It has to be built to last.

The sale of your practice should start long before it is announced publicly. Proper preparation is essential.
Not since the consolidation in our industry back in the 90’s has there been so much interest in therapy practice sales, mergers and consolidations.  Regardless of whom you might end up selling to, two points to always keep in mind are that (1) anything that increases the volume or the security of future revenue will increase the value of your practice, and (2) what makes your practice valuable to you will make it valuable to a buyer.

Learning Objectives:

1) Understand the specific criteria used to determine the valuation of a practice, including EBITDA, goodwill, infrastructure etc. and what are viewed as value makers versus value takers in the industry.
2) Understand the steps necessary  to prepare your practice to bring it to market and when to get this process started
3) Find out the financial preparation and forms you need to have in place and for review during  due diligence
4) Discuss differences between an outright acquisition, merger, and structured buy in and what determines the best fit for your scenario
5) Understand what makes negotiating with a fellow therapists versus a corporate entity so different and how
you can level the playing field
6)  Discuss the pros and cons of using a broker or intermediary and what makes a qualified buyer
7)  See what you need to do so that you can answer the #1 question: “Can this practice exist without you?”
8)  Understand the steps necessary in selling a practice including non disclosure agreements (NDA), letters of intent (LOI) and purchase agreements.
YES YES YES!!!!  if you are considering buying another therapist’s practice, this info is VERY relevant for you too!

This webinar is to take the angst out of selling a practice and present the information in user friendly, logical steps. The issue will be presented from both the perspective of the buyer and the seller. Live Q/A!

This webinar is presented by Iris Kimberg, MS PT OTR
CEO of NYTherapyguide.com who, on her own, sold her therapy agency in a multi million $ deal to a Fortune 500 company. She has worked on valuations of many  practices and helped sell over 2 dozen OT PT and ST practices in the last number of years.

If you cannot make the live webinar, you will be able to access the recorded version 24/7/365.  All registrants will have access to the recording.
Ask questions live.  Watch from your home on your desktop, laptop, ipad or smart phone. Iris has presented this material for the APTA PPS conference and privately to over 300 therapists. Early rate registration – $85 until Oct 31.  $95 Nov.1

A very well established, highly regarded pediatric/adult  sensory based practice in Central Florida is available for sale. This is a great opportunity to purchase a thriving practice or to establish a fantastic second location.

Due to the upcoming retirement of the owner, this fantastic sensory based private practice is being offered for sale. It is almost exclusively self-pay, averages a 100 plus productive visits per week, receives approximately 10 new patients per month, and has long term part and full time OTRs and COTAs, who treat the majority of the patients and are eager to stay on at the practice under new ownership. It enjoys a stellar reputation with local physicians, schools, and colleagues for its individualized care and unique sensory based treatment approach. The practice is fully up to date with EMRs, a Computer Network, File Server, Multiple Work stations, Wireless Router and Cable Internet. Although the practice is currently owned by an OT, it is felt that a like minded health professional from another discipline could successfully run and expand the practice. The practice is located very close to one of Florida’s fastest growing cities. The  1500 square feet office includes 3 treatment spaces, each with multiple suspensions, a testing and evaluation room, a kitchenette and office spaces. The lease is reasonable, transferable and renewable. An added potential bonus is that the building owner has indicated willingness to sell, providing an opportunity not only for real estate ownership but also to increase  space utilization up to approximately 4,500SF, bring in other health professionals, services etc.  For any party interested in both the real estate and the professional practice, please note that these would be 2 separate, mutually exclusive transactions.

Full financial information including but not limited to profit and loss statements, balance sheets, and tax returns for the last three years are available for inspection. The gross revenue for the company is over $500K, and is projected to reach $600K for 2017.

While the client waitlist suggests that there is tangible evidence for growth, the current owner’s prioritization of service and effectiveness – rather than expansion, continues to yield a solid profit margin. Services, almost exclusively private pay, are underwritten by strong interest and commitment of parents.  Currently there is no active marketing/social media program which could also drive additional clients to the practice.

The practice is being offered at $475,00 with negotiable terms.  The owner is willing to stay on for a reasonable transition period, and might consider longer-term employment opportunities with new owner.
Serious inquiries only:  Please contact Iris Kimberg, MS PT OTR on behalf of the practice owner at
iris@nytherapyguide.com.

Get the Recorded CHAT! Independent Contractors vs. Employees – What You Need to Know

INDEPENDENT CONTRACTORS VS. EMPLOYEES Wednesday September 27th 7:30-8:30 PM $25 Whether you are a practice owner who hires therapists, a therapist hired by a private practice, a home care agency, or hospital, or a therapist who holds themselves out to the public as an independent contractor, understanding what  these classifications really mean  is vital and has important ramifications for both parties.  It is time to take this issue out of the gray matter and separate fact from fiction. UBER has brought the matter of worker classification to the forefront in the last year but therapists have been dealing with this issue for 20 years!! This issue will be presented in detail from all perspectives as far as therapists are concerned, and from the vantage point of the Internal Revenue Service and the Labor Department, regardless of what state you live in. The purpose of this group chat is intended to help you: 1) Understand the specific criteria used to determine whether a therapist should be deemed an employee or an independent contractor 2) Understand the rule of “Substance over Form “ application – why the substance of what a therapist does is far more important than the contract they sign! 3) Find out the specifics of what you can do to protect yourself if: a. you want to classify a therapist as an IC b. you want to classify some therapists as employees and some as Ics 4) Find out how to “clean” up your worker classifications before an audit 5) Find out what to do if you think you are being misclassified You can submit questions in advance at iris@nytherapyguide.com  and also ask questions live.
Both chats will be recorded so if you cannot attend live, you can still get the info, which includes the powerpoints. the Q/A etc. Enrollment is limited to 20 per session to encourage engagement and participation.

 

Looking Into the Future for a Child With Autism As my son’s limitations became clearer, I found it harder every year to write a vision statement for his I.E.P. Then he showed us how.

Reprinted from the NYTimes – written by 

How do you write about the happy life you hope for your child to have when you have a hard time picturing it yourself?

For 18 years, I’ve dreaded the yearly ritual of writing a “vision statement” for an Individualized Education Plan, or I.E.P., for our son, Ethan. He has autism and, as any parent of a child with significant special needs knows, the yearly team meeting to develop the I.E.P. can be emotional and fraught. For us it has felt, at times, like an annual adjustment of expectations downward. In theory, the vision statement is a lovely idea — an opportunity for parents to articulate the optimistic future they envision for their child five years down the road. In reality, as Ethan grew up and his limitations — cognitive and behavioral — became clearer, I found it harder every year to write the short paragraph. We came to see he couldn’t live independently, get married, work in a job without support — but if those are the givens, what does a hopeful future look like?

This year, as Ethan turned 21 and completed his final year in the school system, he shocked us by writing his own vision statement. Reading his words made me realize how wrong I’d been for years, trying to articulate what my son’s future should look like.

While Ethan was still in elementary school, our vision statements included the same wish list I imagine every parent of a child with autism probably has: better communication, fewer meltdowns, more independence. When he was 12, I got more pragmatic, “We wonder if Ethan’s love of farm machinery might one day become an employment opportunity.” At 13, after a successful stint in the middle school chorus, I wrote, “Ethan would like a future in music, perhaps as a professional singer?” At that point Ethan was still working on using a Kleenex to blow his nose. A future as a singer was far-fetched, I knew, but I wrote it as a way of saying: Ethan does have abilities. We’re serious about developing them.

This is the great challenge parents face in these yearly meetings: You’re fighting for teachers to help your child work toward a future that, with every year, feels as if it’s growing narrower and bleaker. When it’s clear he’ll never understand money well enough to make change, you cross off the possibility of working in any retail job. When he can’t stop rubbing his nose or touching his mouth at work, all food service opportunities dissolve as well. When his self-talk disturbs the nursing home residents where he genuinely likes volunteering, another door closes.

After six months, we got a jolly report. “He’s fun! And a pretty good worker for about one to two hours a day.” After a year, we were told he’d made it onto a landscaping crew. “What do you do on the crew?” we asked.

“Stuff,” Ethan said and listed a few machines we assumed he was watching other people operate. He could mow a lawn, we knew, but he couldn’t use a leaf blower. Or a weed whacker. We’ve lived with Ethan for 21 years. We know his limitations.

At our last I.E.P. meeting a representative from the farm came and read a report from Ethan’s “Crew Captain.” We heard that, indeed, Ethan was operating those machines, safely and effectively, along with this final line: “Ethan makes us laugh every day.”

I could hardly believe it. I stole a look at his dad and smiled.

This meeting fell at a particularly demanding time in my life and I’d arrived without writing a vision statement ahead of time. When I started to apologize, the vocational coordinator — a young woman who’d struggled for four years to find a job placement for Ethan — held up her hand. “It’s fine. Ethan wrote his own this year.” Apparently he’d dictated it to her on a recent visit to the farm. A few minutes later, he read it aloud:

“After I graduate from high school I plan to work at Prospect Meadow Farm until I retire and live at home with my family as long as I can. I’d like to keep taking classes at Berkshire Hills Music Academy. For fun, I want to play Special Olympics basketball, go to our cabin in Vermont and the shore in New Jersey, mow lawns, and collect business cards. My goals for the future are to take the PVTA bus into town to make purchases, and someday learn how to drive a zero-turn lawn mower.”

For a full five seconds after he finished, no one said anything. I looked across the table at his speech therapist who had known him since he was 14 years old. She had tears in her eyes. I did, too.

Not simply because Ethan had articulated his own entirely reasonable vision statement, but because it incorporated every aspect of his present life that brings him joy. After years of fabricating visions for a future we never honestly thought possible, Ethan was offering one that was both optimistic and breathtakingly simple: I want my life to keep looking the way it does now.

Update on Fellow Therapists Impacted by Hurricane Harvey and How to Donate to Them

Thanks to great networking efforts, especially from Nikki Goodale OT (an OT in Texas who lives north of the impact area),  we are beginning to identify therapists who have been personally and directly impacted by the hurricane.

Wendy McAnally OT is the  co-owner of the  preschool/clinic New Horizons.  Desiree Mataya PT and Tricia Weger  ST are co workers. The preschool is located in Dickinson, Texas just south of Houston, one of the most devastated areas. With 2-3 feet of water, they have no idea of the extent of the damage to the building and their equipment. Of course, none of the therapists at working at this moment, and there is no timetable for when they will be able to return to the school.

Kristen Murphy,OT
works for River Kids Texas   a pediatric home health company that serves a large area of Houston and surrounding areas. One of the company’s owners is also an OT.  Kristen  was displaced and rescued by boat from her home and is now first able to go back and see the damage.  She gets paid per home health visit and is losing wages due to being out of work, displaced and her patients being displaced with flooded homes.  Alexis Belk, PTA at RiverKids, also was  displaced from her apartment, and rescued by boat due to flooding., lost 2 cars, and does not know when viable employment in home health will again be an option due to widespread displacement of her case load.
We anticipate that there will be many other therapists who own practices or work for practices that have been impacted, have homes that have been destroyed or damaged, etc. No matter how much FEMA or other funds come to be, distribution takes time, and has often  proven not to cover all the losses these therapists have or will sustain.

A Plumfund has been set up for these therapists. We will continue to add therapists in need from  damages/ losses sustained by Hurricane  Harvey. To donate 

In addition, more than one therapist brought this longtime TEXAS group to my attention: Apparently it is all volunteer run, many therapists are involved, and they need $$$ and gently used DME for the Texas communities they serve. THEY NEED WHEELCHAIRS NOW!!! Here is their website and how you can donate to them.
If anyone hears of a therapist that should be included, please email me directly at iris@nytherapyguide.com Thanks in advance.
Iris ( Kimberg, MS PT OTR)

Here’s a great read for all pediatric therapists about selected current NDT

Whether you need a refresher or are new to NDT, here’s an informative read by Gerard J. DeMauro, PT, MSPT, C/NDT

The Conceptualization of NDT-Based Handling Techniques for Infants: Two Perspectives  

Preface   The article is intended to provide both general and more detailed information on the NDT (NeuroDevelopmental Treatment) / Bobath frame of practice applicable for infants with and/or at risk for cerebral palsy and related neuromotor disorders.  Readers, including habilitative therapists, will benefit from an update of theories and concepts applicable to this approach.  It is also intended to orient those less familiar with NDT and thus may be of interest to healthcare professionals involved in the examination, evaluation and/or referral of infants for therapeutic assessment and/or treatment.  Below, the most current and comprehensive operational definition of NDT is included.  Its review includes NDT’s role in the management of infants as well as children with CP and related disorders throughout their lifespan.  The NDT frame of reference is also applicable to adults with strokes and head injuries.
Click here to access the full article.

Gerard J. DeMauro, PT, BS/MS, C/NDT has been a physical therapist for nearly 40 years. In addition to teaching, Gerard still maintains an active private practice in NYC, and is available to present at workshops for therapists, educators and parents on topics related to physical therapy practice in pediatrics. You can email Gerald directly  at Gdemauro101@aol.com  to ask any questions, or to make arrangements for specific presentations related to the pediatric practice of physical therapy.

 


Finally, there’s 101 Mobility . Set yourself and your patients in motion! Here’s a  good source for patients who are being discharged, want to age in place, or go try out options to improve the quality of their lives.

About 101 Mobility – NOW IN WHITE PLAINS NY

For those with physical limitations, 101 Mobility designs and installs the optimal solutions to provide liberation from your restraints. And, where there are restrictions, limitations, challenges and frustrations, our local teams of experts will work relentlessly until you are completely satisfied. After all, the true power of our brand is the people — the experts, problem solvers and trusted allies that work hard every day to deliver the best solutions to you.

Full access. Full mobility. That is how we change lives for the better.
768 N. Broadway White Plains NY 10603
914 448 0101  whiteplains.101mobility.com

Leading Westchester County Peds Practice has Openings for PTs and OTs

Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy Positions Available –   Sign on Bonus
A leading Pediatric Therapy practice in Westchester County, NY is looking for energetic, licensed and experienced PT’s and OT’s to join our team. We are a multi-disciplinary practice providing OT, PT and SP, servicing infants thru teens. Positions available in our office as well as local public/private schools. Full-time and Part-time positions available.   With a focus on the whole child, our team of therapists are dedicated to providing children with the therapeutic interventions that will help them reach their potential.  Weekly staff meetings and clinical supervision provided in a supportive, friendly and professional environment.  Competitive salary based on experience and/or educational background.
Current NYS PT/OT license required.  Will consider new grads with strong pediatric fieldwork placements.
Please forward resume to admin@dynamickidsny.com or contact DK at 914-428-5151.
http://dynamickidsny.com/